Seat Cushions

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Seat Cushions: Coccyx and Orthopedic Seat Cushions for Pain Relief

Coccyx Tailbone Pain Relief

Coccyx or tailbone pain is often caused by falling backwards, by falling downstairs or by childbirth. But in about a third of cases, it comes on for no apparent reason. It makes it very painful to sit down.

Tips to make life more comfortable

  • Seat Cushions - To relieve the pressure on the coccyx, you need a cushion or a seat with a cut-out at the back, under the coccyx. Sometimes donut cushions are suggested, but these do not help, as they are designed to take the pressure off the perineum, further forward than the coccyx.
  • Change positions - It is best not to stay in one position (whether sitting, standing or kneeling) too long - you could easily cause other aches and pains. You can use a timer to remind you to change position every 15 or 20 minutes.
  • Lean forward - Leaning forward in your seat may lessen the pain. It helps if you have a table to rest your arms on. It needs to be the right height, and you need to be careful to avoid straining your back.
  • Find comfortable clothes - Some clothes can make the problem worse, such as tight jeans. Loose clothes that do not squeeze your bottom together are the most comfortable.
  • Stand up - Don"t sit down unless you have to. Tell people you prefer to stand. You can put your computer on top of a pile of books and stand at your desk. You can even buy desks that move up and down so that you can switch between standing and sitting.

Most often, coccyx pain is caused by the coccyx partly dislocating when you sit. But there can be other causes of pain in this area. You will have to go to a doctor for advice on and treatment of your particular problems. The best thing that you could do is to go to one of the specialists recommended by other coccyx pain patients. There is a list of them on www.coccyx.org, which also has a lot of further information, and stories from other sufferers.

Jon Miles, coccyx.org



 
 
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